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CASA BLUE, the last moments in the life of frida kahlo

Marking the Centennial of the birth of Frida Kahlo

By Jeremy Childs, Karen Garcia, and Todd Olson

"I hope the leaving is joyful - and I hope never to return"

–last entry in the journal of Frida Kahlo, July, 1953

“Frida Kahlo’s art was like a ribbon…wrapped around a bomb.” –Andre Breton

Mexico’s most famous painter comes to life…and death. As the world marks the centennial of her birth, we celebrate the most famous painter to come from Mexico, Frida Kahlo. Victim of a tragic streetcar accident as a teenager, Frida was emblematic of the idea that out of pain can come positive energy. She championed the indigenous culture of her country in a style combining realism and surrealism, and her steamy romance (and two marriages) with painter Diego Rivera has been called one of the greatest, if not most unusual, love affairs of all time. Though physically fragile, Frida was a tough-talking woman who smoked and drank, and had affairs with men and women, including one with Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky. She was a person who had a huge appetite for life, and her legacy and body of work remain sensual and alive, more popular now 50 years after her death.

SETTING

Frida’s deathbed in Casa Azul (Blue House) in Coyoacan , Mexico , a suburb of Mexico City . Her life as it flashes before her eyes, moments before she succumbs.

ACT ONE

Prologue – her deathbed

THE WAKING

THE JOURNEY THROUGH “PINZON”

Part I – her youth

A TOUR OF FRIDA’S FAMILY

TOASTS AND SPEECHES

Part II – her first accident

THE STREETCAR

IBSEN IN THE HOSPITAL

SHE LEARNED TO PAINT HERSELF

Part III – her second accident

WEDDING PHOTO

FRIDA DRESSES FOR THE NEW WORLD

AMERICAN PARTY

SHE LEARNED TO PAINT HER LONLINESS

FRIDA AND THE FETUS

Part IV – her independence

NATURE OF DUALITY

FRIDA’S WOMEN

LOVE LETTERS

FIGHTS ACROSS THE BRIDGE

DEIGO DEFENDS HIMSELF…A FEW LITTLE PRICKS

THE HAIRCUT

There will be one 15-minute intermission

ACT TWO

Part V – her myth

FRIDA THE ART TEACHER

THE SUICIDE OF DOROTHY HALE

THE SHOW IN PARIS

Part VI – her legacy

DOUGH

COMMERCE

-the cacophony of stuff
-fashion
-pushin’ the book
-sexy tequila
-material girl

THE FEMINISTS DEBATE

THE ACADEMIC

Part VII – her endgame

HER FINAL PAINTINGS

BACK OPERATION

LURE OF MORPHINE

THE DARK ANGEL

THE AMPUTATION

FRANKENSTEIN

11 DAYS BEFORE SHE DIED

Epilogue – the last moments in the life

GOODBYE


FRIDA KAHLO bio

Frida Kahlo was born in Coyoacan on July 6, 1907. In 1925 she was involved in a streetcar accident which left her with permanent injuries. Among these were vertebrae fractures, pelvis fractures, fractures in her right foot and a serious abdominal wound caused by a handrail. She was expected to never recover enough to walk again, though she eventually did. The rest of her life was punctuated with treatments and surgeries, including the amputation of her right leg in order to mitigate the effects of her injuries. In 1929, she married Mexican muralist Diego Rivera. The two were divorced and then later remarried. Much has been written about their stormy relationship. Rivera was clearly a pivotal force in Frida's life and she in his. Throughout her life Frida was a fierce nationalist and a vocal socialist. As a reflection of her beliefs, Frida often wore the indigenous clothing of Mexico. This can be seen both in photographs of her and in her paintings. Frida completed 143 paintings during her lifetime, 55 of which are self-portraits. Many of these self-portraits are among her most famous works. Her works were often classified as surrealist, although she did not like this label. The colors and many of the symbols used in her work are clearly influenced by Mexican tradition. She died in 1954.


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